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High Noon

High Noon at the Upcountry History Museum
2018 Fall Schedule

High Noon is presented by Furman University. All lectures begin at noon on Wednesdays and last one hour. For more information, contact Furman’s University Communications office at 864-294-3107 or vince.moore@furman.edu.

*** There is no High Noon program on Oct. 17 as the Museum is hosting Lunchbox Learning with Bill Fitzpatrick. Learn more. ***

October 10

“International Trade: Where Do We Go From Here?”
Thomas Smythe, Professor of Business, Furman University

At a time when President Trump’s trade policies have created quite a bit of controversy, Dr. Smythe will examine how international trade has evolved over time and why returning to bilateral agreements is not an effective policy.

October 24

“Phishing, Twitter Bombs and Trolls: How to Hack an American Presidential Election”
J. Thomas Allen, Daniel Distinguished Professor of Computer Science Emeritus, Furman University

Digital media and communications have provided significant advantages for many aspects of our lives. But they also introduce new vulnerabilities with unexpected consequences for a normal, functioning democracy. Dr. Allen will examine some of the prominent ways in which hackers sought to interrupt and tamper with the 2016 American presidential election.

October 31

“Red Wave? Blue Wave? Forecasting the Midterm Election”
Danielle Vinson, Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Furman University

Most of the pundits expect major Democratic gains, while the President expects a red wave of Republicans. Dr. Vinson will look at what political science tells us we should expect in the midterm Congressional elections and why we might or might not want to believe it.

November 7

“Back to Normal? Analyzing the Results of the Midterm Election”
Jim Guth, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Furman University

American midterm elections usually follow predictable patterns, but nothing seems predictable in the Trump era. In what ways did the Congressional contests follow historical trends and how did they deviate? And what policy changes will follow in the aftermath?